Gavel Grab

Archive for the 'Media Monitoring' Category

Friday Gavel Grab Briefs

In other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Among bills prefiled in the South Carolina legislature are measures to change or end the way the legislature elects judges, according to Gavel to Gavel, a publication of the National Center for State Courts.
  • Progressive Pulse, a blog of North Carolina Policy Watch, discussed reports “about judges who are taking critical look at how court decisions are impacting their communities.”
  • “Here Come the Million Dollar Judges,” an essay by Billy Corriher of the Center for American Progress (see Gavel Grab), was reprinted by Newsweek.
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Thursday Gavel Grab Briefs

In other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Court arguments about whether plaintiffs’ lawyers in a judicial election-related racketeering lawsuit can depose Illinois Justice Lloyd Karmeier (see Gavel Grab for background) are reported by the Madison-St. Clair Record. Its article is headlined, “Hale attorneys deny accusing State Farm of bribing Justice; Defense points to discovery answer, ‘purchasing the vote.’”
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Wednesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Federal District Judge Arthur J. Schwab of Pennsylvania, in an opinion, called President Barack Obama’s executive actions on immigration unconstitutional. The New York Times said the opinion had no immediate effect.
  • Dahlia Lithwick wrote a Slate commentary entitled, “The Supreme Court Ignores the Lessons of Ferguson: As the rest of the country worries about police overreach, the justices give cops yet more latitude.”
  • At the Think Progress blog, Billy Corriher of Legal Progress has a piece headlined, “The Judicial Ethics of Serial.”
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Tuesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • After voters chose not to retain District Court Judge Sheri Raphaelson of New Mexico, she vowed to stay on the bench. Now the state Supreme Court has ruled that she must step down from the bench by January, according to the Albuquerque Journal.
  • “Supreme Court watchers wonder if justices are ready to take a same-sex marriage case,” the Washington Post reported.
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Monday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • A Wisconsin Supreme Court candidate’s mentioning it provides a “good reminder” of an unresolved misconduct complaint against Justice David Prosser (see Gavel Grab), the Beloit Daily News editorialized. If the justices do nothing, they send a message of being ” above the law, and immune to accountability for their own behavior,” it said.
  • Supreme Court “Justice Antonin Scalia Says The Constitution Is Silent On Torture,” stated the headline for an Associated Press article about Scalia’s remarks to a Swiss broadcast network.
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Friday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Time may be running out for nominees for the federal bench in North Carolina to win confirmation in the U.S. Senate, given that Republicans will take control of the Senate in January, reports The Progressive Pulse.
  • “Kansas Now Issuing Gender-Neutral Marriage Forms,” the Associated Press says. For background about court action involving marriage for same-sex couples in Kansas, see Gavel Grab.
  • Binyamin Applebaum writes a New York Times magazine column headlined, “Who Wants to Buy a Politician?” He quotes ex-CEO Donald Blankenship of Massey Energy, the central figure in the Supreme Court’s Caperton v. Massey case about runaway election spending, as saying in 2009, “I’ve been around West Virginia long enough to know that politicians don’t stay bought.” Blankenship was recently indicted in connection with a deadly 2010 coal mine explosion.
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Wednesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • The American Civil Liberties Union has asked a federal district court in Kansas to allow married same-sex couples a right to submit joint tax returns, to get family health insurance coverage from Kansas, and to get drivers licenses with their married names, the Lawrence Journal World reported.
  • Justice Seamus McCaffery retired from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court recently after he was linked to a pornographic email scandal. Now he is receiving a public pension of $11,000 per month, the Associated Press said.
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Monday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Justice Michael Cavanagh has served on the Michigan Supreme Court for 32 years. He is retiring due to a provision of the Michigan Constitution barring judicial candidates who have attained age 70, the Associated Press reported.
  • Gov. Sam Brownback of Kansas is preparing to appoint a judge for a vacancy created on the Court of Appeals when he nominated Caleb Stegall of that court for the Kansas Supreme Court, according to the Associated Press.
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Friday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Two more candidates have thrown their hats in the ring for Pennsylvania’s 2015 state Supreme Court elections.  Superior Court Judge David Wecht has announced his candidacy, according to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. The Wecht name is well-known in the state:  Wecht’s father is former Allegheny County Medical Examiner Cyril Wecht, a nationally known forensics expert. Another candidate, Rebecca Warren, has also announced plans to run, according to her campaign Facebook page and online reports.  Warren is currently the District Attorney for Montour County.
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Thursday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • A panel of the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals stayed the execution of Scott Panetti of Texas, the Los Angeles Times reported. Panetti’s backers argued he is too mentally ill to be executed.
  • The seven-member New York State Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, will start the year with only five members, North Country Public Radio said.
  • Court of Appeals Judge Sam J. Ervin IV told a local Rotary Club about his successful campaign for the state Supreme Court, including his refusal to talk about “hot-button issues” in order to avoid giving any impression of bias, according to a Morganton News Herald article.
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